Compare amoxicillin vs. Erygel

Head-to-head comparisons of medication uses, side effects, ratings, and more.

Amoxil (amoxicillin)

Prescription only

Akne-Mycin (Erythromycin)

Prescription only
Treats bacterial infections.

Amoxil (amoxicillin) is a good and cheap antibiotic that comes in different forms to treat many types of bacterial infections.

3.7/ 5 average rating with 786 reviewsforamoxicillin
Topical treatment for acne.

Akne-Mycin (Erythromycin) is a very common acne treatment you apply to the skin that may work better when combined with other topical medicines.

3.4/ 5 average rating with 93 reviewsforErygel
Upsides
  • First choice medicine to treat many bacterial infections.
  • Available in generic.
  • Available in different forms: tablet, capsule, and liquid. The liquid comes in many different flavors to make it taste better for people who don't like pills.
  • Side effects are generally not too bad compared to other antibiotics.
  • Applying erythromycin to the skin reduces the amount of acne bacteria and "calms" the skin down (lowers the inflammatory response) in acne.
  • Available in a gel formulation which may be better if your skin is very oily.
  • Better choice if you're pregnant. erythromycin is categorized as pregnancy Category B (likely safe) as compared to similar topical medicines that are Category C (weigh risks vs benefits).
Downsides
  • While Amoxil (amoxicillin) can be used to treat different bacterial infections, many don't respond to it.
  • Can cause diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting.
  • Except for the extended-release form, you have to take Amoxil (amoxicillin) 2 to 3 times a day, which can be hard to remember.
  • The extended-release form can be more expensive because it's a brand name.
  • There's a risk of irritation with anything you apply to your skin and this is no different. erythromycin, like other topical antibiotics, can cause skin irritation and may appear as redness, peeling, abnormal dryness or stinging, tightening, or burning sensations.
  • It's rare, that a serious allergic reaction would occur, but it's a good idea to test a small area of skin before using on any larger or sensitive areas
  • Studies show it works better when combined with other topical medicines to fight acne and reduce the risk of it losing its effectiveness over time.
  • Can cause severe inflammation of the large intestine (pseudomembranous colitis)
  • Stop using if you don't notice any improvement in your acne after 6-8 weeks. The most time you can use it is three months.
Used for
Dosage forms
  • Pill
  • Chewable tablet
  • Extended-release tablet
  • Liquid
  • Cream, gel, or ointment
  • Topical solution
Price
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Reviews
786 reviews so far
62%
saidit'sworth it
45%
saiditworked well
14%
saidit'sa big hassle

Have you used Amoxil (amoxicillin)?

Leave a review
93 reviews so far
46%
saidit'sworth it
34%
saiditworked well
19%
saidit'sa big hassle

Have you used Akne-Mycin (Erythromycin)?

Leave a review
Side effects
The Amoxil (amoxicillin) FDA package insert doesn’t have numbers about how common side effects are.
1possible side effects
  • Burning
    25%
See more detailed side effects
Risks and risk factors
  • Interaction with birth control
    • Using oral birth control pills
  • Severe diarrhea
    • Taking Amoxil (amoxicillin) for a long time
  • Severe allergic reaction
    • History of penicillin allergies
  • New infections while taking Amoxil (amoxicillin)
    • Weakened immune system
    • Not taking Amoxil (amoxicillin) correctly
  • Rash
    • Mononucleosis
See more detailed risks and warnings
  • Allergic reaction
  • Skin irritation
    • Using other medicines or products that irritate the skin
    • Eczema
    • Extreme temperatures (hot or cold)
  • Development of more serious infections
See more detailed risks and warnings
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Disclaimer: We don't provide medical advice. If you think you might have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately.