Compare Angeliq vs. Combipatch

Head-to-head comparisons of medication uses, side effects, ratings, and more.

Relieves hot flashes and vaginal dryness due to menopause.

Angeliq (drospirenone / estradiol) helps relieve menopausal symptoms. There can be many side effects, so it's important to think through the benefits and potential hassles of this drug before using it.

Treats low estrogen and relieves menopause symptoms.

Combipatch (estradiol / norethindrone patch) is a twice weekly patch that effectively treats menopause and causes less blood clots or stroke than combination pills.

Upsides
  • Angeliq (drospirenone / estradiol) replaces estrogen to your whole body and relieves multiple symptoms due to low estrogen (hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness).
  • Useful for women who experience moderate to severe symptoms of menopause.
  • Improves mood, energy, and mental alertness for some people.
  • Good for women with an intact uterus. The drospirenone (a progestin) protects against the risk of cancer in the uterus from estrogen treatment.
  • Twice weekly patch. Good for people who don't want to take daily pills.
  • Replenishes estrogen to your whole body and relieves multiple symptoms due to low estrogen (hot flashes, vaginal dryness).
  • Less likely to cause blood clots or stroke than pills since patches contain a lower amount of hormones.
  • Good for women with an intact uterus.
  • You can bathe, shower, and swim while wearing the patch, as long as you don't rub the patch.
Downsides
  • There are more possible side effects since it exposes your whole body to two hormones.
  • Angeliq (drospirenone / estradiol) can't be used by women who have had their uterus removed.
  • You may get irregular bleeding and spotting that can last a few months to a year.
  • Compared to other estrogen-progestin combination medicines, you might be more likely to have blood clots with Angeliq (drospirenone / estradiol).
  • Angeliq (drospirenone / estradiol) might increase your potassium, which can be dangerous if you're taking other medicines that do the same.
  • More potential side effects than single ingredient medications since it exposes your whole body to two hormones.
  • You may get irregular bleeding and spotting that can last a few months to a year.
  • The patch can't be exposed to direct sunlight for long periods of time.
  • Can be expensive since it's only available as a brand name product.
Used for
  • Hot flashes
  • Vaginal dryness and inflammation
  • Low estrogen
  • Primary ovarian failure
Dosage forms
  • Pill
  • Patch
Price
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Reviews
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Side effects
7possible side effects
  • Stomach pain
    6%
  • Headache
    6%
  • Yeast infections
    6%
  • Breast pain
    3%
  • Nausea
    3%
  • Diarrhea
    2%
  • Swelling of arms and legs
    2%
See more detailed side effects
36possible side effects
  • Breast pain
    34%
  • Menstrual cramps
    30%
  • Headache
    25%
  • Skin irritation
    20%
  • Pain
    19%
  • Stuffy nose
    19%
  • Menstrual problems
    17%
  • Back pain
    15%
  • Flu like symptoms
    14%
  • Diarrhea
    14%
  • Lung infection
    13%
  • Stomach pain
    12%
  • Accidental injury
    10%
  • Weakness
    10%
  • Sinus infection
    10%
  • Vaginal discharge
    10%
  • Sore throat
    9%
  • Vaginal inflammation
    9%
  • Upset stomach
    8%
  • Nausea
    8%
  • Depression
    8%
  • Trouble sleeping
    8%
  • Gas
    7%
  • Tooth problems
    6%
  • Swelling in the arms and legs
    6%
  • Joint pain
    6%
  • Dizziness
    6%
  • Rash
    6%
  • Infection
    5%
  • Nervousness
    5%
  • Airway inflammation
    5%
  • Acne
    4%
  • Unusual menstrual bleeding
    3%
  • Constipation
    2%
  • Breast growth
    2%
  • Heavy menstrual bleeding
    2%
See more detailed side effects
Risks and risk factors
  • Endometrial cancer
    • Using estrogen for more than one year
  • Breast cancer
    • Personal or family history of breast cancer
    • Using estrogen for more than one year
  • Increased risk of blood clots and stroke
    • Personal or family history of blood clots
    • Smoking
    • Obesity
    • Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)
  • Increased risk of heart disease
    • Smoking
    • Obesity
    • High blood pressure
    • High blood sugar
    • High cholesterol
    • Age 50 or older
  • Dementia
    • Age 65 or older
  • Increased potassium
    • Kidney disease
    • Liver disease
    • Addison's disease
    • Medicines that cause high potassium levels
See more detailed risks and warnings
  • Endometrial cancer
    • Using estrogen for more than one year
  • Breast cancer
    • Personal or family history of breast cancer
    • Using estrogen for more than one year
  • Increased risk of blood clots and stroke
    • Personal or family history of blood clots
    • Smoking
    • Obesity
    • Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)
  • Dementia
    • Aged 65 or older
  • Pancreas swelling (pancreatitis)
    • High levels of triglycerides
  • Gallbladder problems
See more detailed risks and warnings
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Disclaimer: We don't provide medical advice. If you think you might have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately.