Cardiovascular disease

High blood pressure

(Hypertension)

About High blood pressure

Blood pressure is the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries. Each time your heart beats, it pumps blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats, pumping the blood. This is called systolic pressure. When your heart is at rest, between beats, your blood pressure falls. This is called diastolic pressure.

Your blood pressure reading uses these two numbers. Usually the systolic number comes before or above the diastolic number. A reading of

  • 119/79 or lower is normal blood pressure
  • 140/90 or higher is high blood pressure
  • Between 120 and 139 for the top number, or between 80 and 89 for the bottom number is called prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it.

High blood pressure usually has no symptoms, but it can cause serious problems such as stroke, heart failure, heart attack and kidney failure.

You can control high blood pressure through healthy lifestyle habits and taking medicines, if needed.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Symptoms of High blood pressure
  • Usually has no symptoms but can cause stroke, heart failure, or heart attack

Top Medications for High blood pressure according to our users

Button Group. All currently active

All Medications for High blood pressure

  • Calcium channel blocker > Dihydropyridine

    • Lotrel
      (Amlodipine / Benazepril)
      Prescription only

      Lotrel (Amlodipine / Benazepril) is good because it combines two first-line medications to lower blood pressure, and it's available in generic. However, it can cause throat irritation or a dry cough, and you can't stop it suddenly since it can cause your blood pressure to rise.

      Was it worth it?
      • Available dosage forms:
      • Pill

ACE inhibitor

  • Lotrel
    (Amlodipine / Benazepril)
    Prescription only

    Lotrel (Amlodipine / Benazepril) is good because it combines two first-line medications to lower blood pressure, and it's available in generic. However, it can cause throat irritation or a dry cough, and you can't stop it suddenly since it can cause your blood pressure to rise.

    Was it worth it?
    • Available dosage forms:
    • Pill
  • Laxative > Bulk-producing

    • Metamucil
      (Psyllium)
      Over-the-counter

      The natural psyllium fiber in Metamucil (Psyllium) does more than relieve constipation. It lowers cholesterol, keeps blood sugar levels healthy, and makes you feel less hungry between meals.

      • Available dosage forms:
      • Liquid
  • Vasodilator > Direct-acting

    • Minoxidil
      Prescription only

      Loniten (Minoxidil) should only be used to treat blood pressure when other medications can’t.

      • Available dosage forms:
      • Pill

Medication side effects for High blood pressure

These are some of the most common side effects from clinical trials for abdominal pain.

  • Accupril: 1%
0 of 100

At this end, no one is expected to have abdominal pain

100 of 100

At this end, almost everyone is expected to have abdominal pain

Tips, success stories, and coping strategies for High blood pressure

What tip would you give someone like me who was just diagnosed?
  • i was just diagnosed following a stroke, which seems bizarre because I exercise and eat right. I weigh 130 lb now, but at the time of the storke I weighed a little bit less. The doctor has monitored my blood pressure, but the mediciane makes me feel horrible. Now, that I am not taking anything my blood pressure ahs stablized to the normal range, but is higher than in the past..
  • Try to keep fluid intake to less than 2000ml. Hydration is great, but fluid volume overload increases the workload of your heart.
  • Take your BLOOD PRESSURE medicine at bedtime
  • Learn about the DASH DIET, and be a semi "raw foodist"
  • Walk briskly 30 minutes a day- 3 bursts of 10 minutes is fine
  • Buy a home BP MONITOR, so you can measure effectiveness of treatment
  • Eat Less Salt and Exercise More
What’s your best coping strategy?

No tips yet for this condition, leave a tip!

Besides medications, what else has worked for you?
  • Exercising
  • Eat less salt and exercise.