Nervous system disorders

Motion sickness

(Airsickness)

  • Also known as
  • Carsickness

About Motion sickness

Motion sickness is a common problem in people traveling by car, train, airplanes and especially boats. Motion sickness can start suddenly, with a queasy feeling and cold sweats. It can then lead to dizziness and nausea and vomiting.

Your brain senses movement by getting signals from your inner ears, eyes, muscles and joints. When it gets signals that do not match, you can get motion sickness. For example, down below on a boat, your inner ear senses motion, but your eyes cannot tell you are moving.

Where you sit can make a difference. The front seat of a car, forward cars of a train, upper deck on a boat or wing seats in a plane may give you a smoother ride. Looking out into the distance - instead of trying to read or look at something in the vehicle - can also help.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Top Medications for Motion sickness according to our users

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All Medications for Motion sickness

  • Anti-nausea > Antihistamine

    • Phenergan
      (Promethazine)
      Prescription only

      Phenergan (Promethazine) is used to treat and prevent nausea and vomiting from surgery, motion sickness, or pregnancy. While it's cheap and available in different forms to make it easier to take, it can make you feel very sleepy, and its side effects mean that children under 2 and adults over 65 shouldn't take it.

      • Available dosage forms:
      • Pill
      • Liquid
      • Suppository
  • Anti-nausea > Anticholinergic

Tips, success stories, and coping strategies for Motion sickness

What tip would you give someone like me who was just diagnosed?
  • Keep Ginger supply always. Tea, dried Ginger very helpful.
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