Pamine

(methscopolamine)

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Decreases stomach acid.

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Our bottom line

Pamine (methscopolamine) has been used in the past with other medicines to treat peptic ulcers, however, it's no longer recommended.

Quick facts about Pamine
  • Drug class: Gastrointestinal
  • Rx status:
  • Generic status: Lower-cost generic available (methscopolamine)
Prices and discounts
Lowest price for 60 2.5mg tablets
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$48.59

Upsides

  • Available as a generic.

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What to expect from Pamine, on one page

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Downsides

  • Although it was approved in the past for peptic ulcers, it hasn't been shown to be effective in treating or preventing peptic ulcers.
  • Side effects tend to appear before you notice its acid lowering effects.

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Get our free fact sheet

What to expect from Pamine, on one page

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Prices and discounts
Lowest price for 60 2.5mg tablets
Determining your location...
$48.59
How it works

Pamine (methscopolamine) is an anticholinergic that works in the stomach to reduce acid.

Quick facts about Pamine
  • Drug class: Gastrointestinal
  • Rx status:
  • Generic status: Lower-cost generic available (methscopolamine)

Dosage forms

  • Pill
Tried Pamine? Write a review!

What to expect when you take Pamine (methscopolamine) for Peptic ulcer disease

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Side effect rates for Pamine (methscopolamine)

Risks and Warnings for Pamine (methscopolamine)

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    • Higher risk if:
    • Ileostomy
    • Colostomy

    If you experience diarrhea while on Pamine (methscopolamine), particularly if you have an ileostomy or colostomy, this may be a sign of an incomplete blockage in your intestine. Stop taking Pamine (methscopolamine) and talk to your doctor right away.

Common concerns from people taking Pamine (methscopolamine)

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Sleep
  • Taking Pamine (methscopolamine) can make you feel drowsy and dizzy, especially if you're taking other medications that can also make you feel sleepy, if you're taking recreational drugs, or if you're drinking too much alcohol. Avoid driving or doing other tasks that require concentration until you know how this medication affects you. Get up very slowly from a seated or lying down position. Avoid alcoholic drinks.