Gastrointestinal disorders

Ulcerative colitis

(IBD)

  • Also known as
  • Inflammatory bowel disease

About Ulcerative colitis

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a disease that causes inflammation and sores, called ulcers, in the lining of the rectum and colon. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease.UC can happen at any age, but it usually starts between the ages of 15 and 30. It tends to run in families. The most common symptoms are pain in the abdomen and blood or pus in diarrhea. Other symptoms may includeAnemiaSevere tirednessWeight lossLoss of appetiteBleeding from the rectumSores on the skinJoint painGrowth failure in childrenAbout half of people with UC have mild symptoms.Doctors use blood tests, stool tests, colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy, and imaging tests to diagnose UC. Several types of drugs can help control it. Some people have long periods of remission, when they are free of symptoms. In severe cases, doctors must remove the colon.NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Symptoms of Ulcerative colitis
  • Abdominal pain
  • Diarrhea
  • Blood or pus in stools
  • Anemia
  • Severe tiredness
  • Sores on the skin
  • Joint pain
  • Growth faillure in children

All Medications for Ulcerative colitis

  • Uceris
    (Budesonide)
    Prescription only

    Uceris (Budesonide) helps treat Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, but you can’t take it for long because of its serious side effects.

    • Available dosage forms:
    • Pill
    • Available dosage forms:
    • Pill
  • Lialda
    (Mesalamine)
    Prescription only

    Lialda (Mesalamine) is an effective first-line medicine for inflammatory bowel disease. There isn't a generic version and you'll have to take it multiple times a day.

    • Available dosage forms:
    • Pill
    • Extended release
    • Enema
    • Suppository
  • Remicade
    (infliximab)
    Prescription only

    Remicade (infliximab) is an effective treatment for many autoimmune diseases, but you can have serious side effects.

    • Available dosage forms:
    • Injection
  • Azulfidine
    (Sulfasalazine)
    Prescription only

    Azulfidine (Sulfasalazine) is used to treat moderate to severe inflammatory bowel conditions. It's also used with other medicines to treat rheumatoid arthritis.

    • Available dosage forms:
    • Pill
    • Extended release
  • Delzicol
    (mesalamine)
    Prescription only

    Delzicol (mesalamine) effectively reduces symptoms of a flare for mild to moderate ulcerative colitis in both children and adults, but can cause burping and stomach discomfort.

    • Available dosage forms:
    • Delayed-release pill
  • Dipentum
    (olsalazine)
    Prescription only

    Dipentum (olsalazine) controls ulcerative colitis with other medicines, but you can't use it if you have a flare-up.

    • Available dosage forms:
    • Pill
  • Rowasa
    (mesalamine)
    Prescription only

    Rowasa (mesalamine) effectively relieves symptoms of mild to moderate ulcerative colitis, but can only be used rectally so it only works on a small part of your intestines.

    • Available dosage forms:
    • Enema
  • Humira
    (adalimumab)
    Prescription only

    Humira (adalimumab) is good for treating many autoimmune conditions, but it can also cause serious side effects.

    • Available dosage forms:
    • Injection
  • Simponi
    (golimumab)
    Prescription only

    Simponi (golimumab) effectively calms down your immune system, but it is given as a shot and puts you at risk of serious infections like tuberculosis or hepatitis B.

    • Available dosage forms:
    • Injection
  • Apriso
    (mesalamine)
    Prescription only

    Apriso (mesalamine) is an effective medication for maintaining remission of ulcerative colitis that's generally well tolerated, but commonly causes headache.

    • Available dosage forms:
    • Extended-release pill
  • Lialda
    (mesalamine)
    Prescription only

    Lialda (mesalamine) effectively reduces symptoms of mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis, and may be less irritating than other formulations, but is brand only, so may be more expensive..

    • Available dosage forms:
    • Delayed-release pill
  • Cortenema
    (hydrocortisone)
    Prescription only

    Cortenema (hydrocortisone) is used with other medicines to treat ulcerative colitis, but will only help with symptoms of the lower intestine, colon, and anus.

    • Available dosage forms:
    • Enema
  • Sandimmune
    (cyclosporine)
    Prescription only

    Sandimmune (cyclosporine) is good at preventing rejection of an organ transplant, but it's more difficult to monitor than Neoral/Gengraf (cyclosporine modified) and isn't good for people with kidney problems.

    • Available dosage forms:
    • Pill
    • Liquid
    • Available dosage forms:
    • Pill
  • Neoral
    (cyclosporine)
    Prescription only

    Neoral (cyclosporine) is good at preventing rejection of a transplanted organ, and is also used for treating rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis.

    • Available dosage forms:
    • Pill
    • Liquid
  • Lialda
    (Mesalamine)
    Prescription only

    Lialda (Mesalamine) is an effective first-line medicine for inflammatory bowel disease. There isn't a generic version and you'll have to take it multiple times a day.

    • Available dosage forms:
    • Pill
    • Extended release
    • Enema
    • Suppository

Tips, success stories, and coping strategies for Ulcerative colitis

What tip would you give someone like me who was just diagnosed?
  • Sulfazalasine

  • Prescription drugs are not the answer, you must first remove all non-organic foods from your diet and then control the inflammation through probiotics/curcumin/boswellin

What’s your best coping strategy?
  • organic only & probiotics put it in final rimission

  • Probiotics (the best you can buy at the health food store!)

  • Take psyllium daily

  • Eat six small meals a day.

Besides medications, what else has worked for you?
  • smoking