Omnipred

(prednisolone acetate)

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Calms down redness and swelling in the eye.

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Omnipred (prednisolone acetate) is a steroid used in the eye that is effective for treatment and symptom relief, but with long-term use, it can have some side effects.

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Quick facts about prednisolone acetate
  • Drug class: Ophthalmic
  • Rx status: Prescription only
  • Generic status: Lower-cost generic available (prednisolone acetate)

Upsides

  • Omnipred (prednisolone acetate) works only within the eye, so it will relieve symptoms without having the side effects of oral steroids.
  • Kicks in relatively quickly to relieve symptoms.
  • Available in generic form.
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What to expect from prednisolone acetate, on one page

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Downsides

  • Depending on the condition, you might have to use Omnipred (prednisolone acetate) up to 4 times a day, particularly in the beginning.
  • If using Omnipred (prednisolone acetate) long-term, may require some monitoring by your doctor.
  • Contains sulfite, so depending on the severity of your allergy, may not be suitable for those with allergies to sulfite.
  • Long-term use can lead to increased risk of more serious side effects.
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What to expect from prednisolone acetate, on one page

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How it works

Prednisolone acetate is a steroid that is similar to your body's natural steroids. It reduces swelling in the eye and alleviates pain, discomfort, or harm.

Quick facts about prednisolone acetate
  • Drug class: Ophthalmic
  • Rx status: Prescription only
  • Generic status: Lower-cost generic available (prednisolone acetate)

Used for

  • Inflammation of the Eye
  • Eye Injury
  • Allergies

Dosage forms

  • Liquid
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Prices and coupons

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What to expect when you take Omnipred (prednisolone acetate) for Inflammatory eye conditions

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  • Effectiveness
  • Starts to kick in
    Full effects
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  • Possible side effects
  • Temporary burning and stinging
  • Blurry vision
  • Allergic reaction
  • Metallic taste in mouth
  • Dilated pupils
  • Increased eye pressure
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Side effect rates for Omnipred (prednisolone acetate)

Risks and Warnings for Omnipred (prednisolone acetate)

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  • Long-term use of steroids might in some cases cause increased pressure in your eyes which can lead to glaucoma or cataracts. If you have glaucoma, talk to your doctor before starting Omnipred (prednisolone acetate) to see if it's safe. Your doctor should check the pressure in your eyes regularly if you have to use Omnipred (prednisolone acetate) for more than 10 days.

Common concerns from people taking Omnipred (prednisolone acetate)

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Pain
  • If inflammation or pain gets worse or lasts longer than 2 days while taking Omnipred (prednisolone acetate), talk to your doctor.